Saturday, 22 September 2012

How to make bouncy 100% fishballs



I love fishballs. Boiled in soup; deep-fried and assembled on a stick; or tossed with noodles in sweet chilli ketchup (or in a chilli-vinegar-lard sauce when I got older) -- I love them all. Growing up in Asia means I've always taken them for granted. They were practically a staple of the school canteen, because all kids love them, even the picky ones who hate fish. I never thought too much of them then; they weren't exactly the height of sophistication or fine dining, so they can't exactly be that challenging to make, can they? I was so wrong.

The art of making fishballs should be eulogised and made into a book or a movie a la Jiro Dreams of Sushi . The old aunties at the wet market selling handmade fishballs should be saluted and invited to world food conventions. The little bubbles of pounded fish paste themselves deserve a much greater notoriety beyond being the casual kopitiam snack. Because these fishballs are a real bitch to make. But since moving to London and being resigned to finding perfectly spherical machine-formed ones in Chinatown's freezer section, often made with more MSG and flour than fish itself, I've made it my mission to delve into the complicated art of fishball-making.

With a few days to go before I return to London, I've finally reached the end of my mission. The tips and recipe that follow are a result of begging/stealing/borrowing from my auntie Siew Fang and the auntie at Bukit Batok wet market, and subjecting my family to a few days of rubbery/mushy fishballs.


WHAT 
The best fishballs here are made with wolf herring (also called ikan parang, or sai toh fish 西刀鱼) or yellowtail snapper (黄尾鱼) but you can also use the spotted mackerel or spanish mackerel. The first two have more bones, so are trickier to handle, but oh, they give such wonderfully sweet fishballs which don't smell overly, well, fishy. I don't know if it would work with other fishes, but you can give it a go. Fishballs used to be made by the poor who didn't want to waste whatever scraps of fish they had, so please save your expensive cod or seabass for steaming or something though.
What else? Some people add cornflour as filler. Some people add MSG. I don't want to, so this is the pure goodness of fish.

HOW
The mark of a successful fishball lies in its 'doink' factor. It should be bouncy and springy to the bite. And the secret to success, is hard work of course. After scraping and mincing the flesh of the fish, you gather the mixture with your hands, bring it up towards you, and slap it back down onto the board. 60 slaps later, you will be rewarded fish paste that quivers seductively when poked. This fish paste can then be shaped into balls, or in the case of handmade ones, blobs, or fried and sliced into fishcakes, or even stuffed into vegetables or tofu puffs to make yong tau foo.


HANDMADE BOUNCY 100%-FISH BALLS
makes 20-30 fishballs, depending on size
Ingredients
1 kg of fish (here I used yellowtail)
water (by volume, it should be about 60-70% that of the fish flesh)
1 1/2 to 2 tbsp sea salt
1 tbsp white pepper

*In true Asian homecooking fashion, everything is kind of "agak agak". I have no weighing scales at home in Singapore so I can only make a rough guess. Sorry.



Method
1. Fillet the fish first if your fishmonger hasn't. Using a ceramic spoon (metal will be too harsh), scrape the flesh off the fish, going with the grain/ in the direction of the fish bones. Carefully feel for any bones and remove any, you don't want to get sued.
2. Mince the fish very finely with the back of a chopper, adding the water salt and pepper at the same time. Or if you're not anal about tradition like my mum is, put into a blender with the water. Add slowly so if you find the paste becoming too wet, stop earlier.
3. Now for some anger therapy action. Gather the mixture with wet hands, bring it up towards you and slap it back down, repeatedly, 60-70 times, or until it comes together and firms up. Too little slapping gives you mushy balls; too much slapping gives you toothy balls. It should wobble a bit when poked.
4. Shape into balls by squeezing the paste in between the crook of your thumb and index finger, and using a spoon to scoop the balls into a basin of cold water, while you finish the rest.
5. When ready to cook, drop into boiling water, or for a simple fishball soup, drop into stock made from the fish bones and heads from earlier (don't waste anything). The fishballs are cooked when they float to the top.



These fishballs, or fish blobs, may not look as perfectly smooth and round and white as their commercial counterparts, but I like them like that. I look at them and feel an immense urge to squish them like I do babies' cheeks. I hold them in between my chopsticks and feel an irresistible urge to bite into them (fishballs only, not babies), and when I do, they burst with the natural sweetness of the sea. My hands smell of fish and my biceps are aching, but hurrah, I've made bouncy 100%-fishballs.

And for some amusement:





126 comments:

  1. I bow to you, oh great fishball wizard. I will make them this week.

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    1. Hah I've not reached wizard standards yet but thanks ;)

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    2. Shu Han you are just what I need. I adore fish balls, have always done and have always had to make do with the MSG Balls. I want to make this for my friends who are MSG Antagonists and some are allergic. I will give it a try and tell you how it was. I love fish doink, doink doinks in soup especially now in winter.The winters here in Frakfurt are getting longer and more severe so fishballs have to be made and eaten. Thanks. Did you just drop from outer space to bring us joy?

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    3. I just saw this comment oh dear! HAHAHAHA I love you! Thank you so much!

      Alien x

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  2. Oh I want to try these "auntie-approved" fish balls! I'm a bit intimidated though by the challenge, and I'm guessing this isn't a recipe I'll get right the first time around! Sounds like your stay in Singapore was great, what did your aunts and relatives think of your making their recipes and taking photographs of food? It's good to be back, and finally catching up on your blog posts.

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    1. They were greatly amused but very pleased to help! They cook such amazing food but are often taken for granted so to be asked for recipes and tips is like a show of (well-deserved) appreciation. I'm glad I'm back too (:

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  3. Oh mY God!! YOU've got to make that for our stuff lunch on the 30th! :)

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    1. If I make for staff lunch, I no energy make anything for the actual supperclub already hahaha.

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    2. love your reply, Singlish will make me giggle for the rest of my days :-)

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  4. Ummm this sounds lovely. I'll take into accont the doink factor when I prepare the fishballs! ;-) I don't think we have yellowtail here, so I'll go for mackerel

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    1. Let me know how it goes with normal mackerel, I'm curious too!

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  5. I can't believe you made it! That's an impossible task! Well done on this post! I am going to have to try it!

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    1. Try and report back k! It takes quite a few times to get the right hang of the texture! Good luck!

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  6. wow great job have heard about these look so good :-)

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  7. I have never tasted fish balls, but seeing these beauties I can well imagine I would fall in love at the first bite. I love bouncy, but not hard meat balls, so your aim to obtain a similar texture here seems more than welcome. Thank you for the great recipe.

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    1. You might have eaten similar things since you're such a fan of jap food! You might have eaten fishcakes? Which are just fried versions of this same fish paste, then sliced.

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  8. So simple and healthy. Getting all ready for winter so I'm searching for soup recipes. I'd like to try yours, I want to make me some bouncy fish balls :)

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    1. Not sure about the simple part.. but yes glad to have inspired you for winter! (:

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  9. I think another important point to make bouncy fish balls is fish must be very fresh also. You have made very nice and bouncy fish balls ! Now I know yellowtail fish also can make bouncy fish balls. Thanks for sharing

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    1. Good point, freshness is always prized in chinese cooking! We got ours straight from the wet market. Yes, yellowtail is in fact quite commonly used for fishballs in singapore!

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  10. I've never eaten fish balls so I can't pretend to know much about them! They look incredible and I love the illustration of the doink. So impressive to take on such a complicated task. Looks like it was worth the effort.

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    1. Hehe thanks, I hope you try some one day. They really are quite different from the texture of fish, there shouldn't be any fish flakes at all!

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  11. I've been experimenting with Norwegian-style fishballs which are made in a similar way except with milk instead of water, but had some trouble with them being too moist. So I have to try the anger therapy technique! And also, re: Jiro Dreams of Sushi, I just recently watched it and loved it :)

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    1. Wow I'm so intrigued by these norwegian fishballs, haven't heard of other cultures also making bouncy fishballs! Please do post it one day, I'll love to see how it's made!

      I LOVE THE MOVIE. I watched it on the plane home and kept craving sushi until I managed to get myself some.

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  12. Brilliant stuff! This looks amazing; can't wait to try it myself.

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  13. I smell something fishy.. :)

    Hats off... You make the whole process looks so easy and fun.

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    1. Heh must be my hands..?
      Thanks, it was fun I must admit! Not so much when I hit my camera filming it..

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  14. Great post! Fishballs are my faves! My parents sometimes fill peppers and aubergines with the 'yu gao'.

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    1. Yah or tofu puffs, for yong tau foo!

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  15. OHHHH MY GOOODNESS, SHU HAN. You really never stop amazing with awesome recipes, one after another. I cannot begin to tell you how much I LOVE fish balls. Fresh, springy, bouncy, homemade fish balls. I can eat them in any form. Though, I must say my favourite is definitely the ones that's been deep fried first and then boiled in the soup until coating is soft. Just because it reminds me of my primary school canteen. Many happy moments of fish ball noodle soups over the years. LOVE ETTTTTTT... Make me some? Pls and thank you.

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    1. Hahaha winston you always make me smile with your over-the-top praises! Thanks so much! I have a thing for plain boiled fishballs with yellow noodles mixed with kway teow, in soup. Childhood favourite (: Happy to make you some, it's gettign them to you that's the problem...

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  16. whoa, is that how you get a fish ball? I though they came in a perfect sphere straight from the ocean! ;) You're always teaching me something new... especially when it comes to fish.

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    1. Yup, and meatballs come in a perfect sphere straight from the fields ;) hehehe.

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  17. Hi Shuhan, I'll admit right off the bat that... I'm sorry, but I just really don't like fish balls! However - seeing them made from scratch I think I'd probably feel differently and might actually enjoy them. The problem is, I've always considered them a bit like hotdogs. Ones that you buy in tins probably have all sorts of crap inside... unidentifiable crap. At least if you make them yourself you know just what's in them.

    My wife actually adores them... she always gets some when she goes to Sweden (they're very common there actually) so maybe I'll swallow my personal feelings about them and give them a try for her sometime soon! :)

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    1. fair enough haha. I really don't like bad hotdogs too, you know the ones that look like skinny pink weiners. The texture just puts me off and liek you said, i don't know what goes into them. Please do try making thme for your wife, that would be so sweet, and who know, you may be a convert!

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  18. This is one of my favorite posts of yours. Love the 'doink' and the video. And the fishballs! I adore fishballs. They remind me a bit of gefilte fish. :)

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    1. YAY. I just went to google gefilte fish. we learn sth new from each other every day (:

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  19. Yep... love fishballs! Back home in Malaysia, there is this "auntie" a short walk away in our neighbourhood and we used to buy fishballs from her. Not sure if she's still selling them. Memories! This is awesome, I've been thinking about making them for awhile and it's cool to see that you've done it!

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    1. Time to go back and pay auntie a visit then? (: Thanks, I hope this inspires you to make them too!!

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  20. you're so right, growing up in an asian household i've taken fishballs for granted. since being away from home i have yet to find good enough fishballs to wax poetry about.

    my concerns range from having to handle the fish myself to then smelling like fish afterward.

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    1. Well then you have right to be concerned because my hands smelt of fish for hours after...

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  21. yay! thank you so much! am a Singaporean living in London too! was craving for fishballs and managed to find your post! gonna try making them!! :)

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    1. HI ELLIE! yay always glad to meet a fellow stranded greedy singaporean (: good luck with this, it is tricky getting it right I must say, so I wish you the best of luck and channel you whatever fishball making powers I have.

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  22. Wow! You've made fish balls & they looks really bouncy too! Looks like the authentic fish balls that we had back home! Well done Shu Han! My mom also use agak-agak recipes! That's how they do it back home, the agak-agak way! :p LOL

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    1. Thanks kit! Yah, I struggle with learning from my mum sometimes, they all just go "agak agak lor" yikes!

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  23. Agh the camera! Lol. Funny what people take for granted. I hadn't even heard of these fish balls until i met Mr Noodles (I had probably eaten them unknowingly though) a couple of years back. Now i really enjoy them, even the machine-made-msg-monsters of Chinatown. I was getting all fired up to make them too. Until I read "60 or 70 times..." I might just stick to the shop bought ones for the time being ;)

    Great tip about removing fish from the bone using a ceramic spoon BTW.

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    1. Hah your hard work will pay off well! Hee mr noodles introduced me to good dim sum in london (:

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  24. I love your lil graphic "Doink". hihi its cute, and I am all for cuteness. =D for sure I ll never forget your doink factor, all fish balls should be bouncy!

    That was another very informative post of yours, I learned something new about asian food again, and I really need to learn more cause I feel kind of stupid these days about the fact that I am in Asia but i don't know the most famous dishes out there.

    We get plenty of fresh mackerels here, so it shouldn't be a problem for me to recreate your famous dish!

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    1. Hee. Well, I live in london now but I can't say I know all of europe's most famous dishes either!

      Not sure if any amckerel would work, I haven't tried it myself, the spotted mackerel ismore commonly considered suitable. Let me know how it turns out, I'm curious too!

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  25. I LLLOOOOVVVEEE fishballs! I remember when I was living at home - I lived in the basement. Some days, I'd wake up to THUMP THUMP THUMP from upstairs and I'd think 'ahhh mum is making fish balls again'. She said the more the THUMP, the bouncier the fish balls will be!!!

    The noise drove me crazy but man, the fish balls were tasty! :)

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    1. Hehe cannot thump too much though, it will be really tough! I'll gladly put up with the noise for fishballs! (:

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  26. I love homemade fishballs! My mom makes it pretty often at home and yes, with the same kind of fish - wolf herring. I make it here from time to time, exactly like your method.. super yum!!

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  27. Hi Shu Han,

    Wow homemade fish balls-I’m seriously impressed!!

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    1. aw thanks, but come one, you've made more impressive stuff before on your blog!!

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  28. I did it - made the fish balls today. And I slapped them on my cutting board 60 times. They were bouncy. They were delicious. Thanks for a new idea.

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    1. YAYYYYYYYYYY SO HAPPY TO HEAR IT WORKS FOR YOU TOO!

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    2. What fish did you use?

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  29. These sound fantastic, I like that they 'donk'. Really interesting post.

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  30. delicious fish balls looks wonderful

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  31. Fluffy soft fish balls in a brothy soup sounds good to me especially when made from scratch...

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  32. you make fishball making so fun! never really appreciate the hardwork it goes into making yummy fishballs. thanks for sharing!

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  33. you make fishball making so fun! never really appreciate the hardwork it goes into making yummy fishballs. thanks for sharing!

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    1. Thanks shannon! It was actually really fun (smelling like fish after that wasn't though..)

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  34. Looks delicious. Such inspiring recipes you got here, thanks for sharing!

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  35. haha, if i have time i'm definitely gonna try making them

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    1. good luck! yah I definitely put this on the "if you are too free" bookmark list.

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  36. I am so excited to try this.... I love fish balls and I've been looking and looking and now, I have found the one that I really like...wish me luck! Thank you for sharing it with us...

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  37. Hi! Thanks for sharing this because the country I stay in at the moment doesn't have fish balls and I miss eating them a lot. With this, at least I can make them on my own. I do have a question though. Can I use filet fish to make fish balls?

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    1. I think you could, but you still need to scrape the flesh so you get fish pulp/paste and then mince finely (or blend, but note it will be trickier to control the consistency!). Also, i think the type of fish does matter, so if you get filet fish, try to get the types I mentioned in the post. Good luck (: (: (:

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  38. Hi Shu Han,

    Me felt the same and decided to make myself. I've learned from my uncle who is a fish monger > 25 years and he got the gong fu from his market friend

    Check this
    http://kohkengmeng.wix.com/hand-slam-fishball

    I am selling partime now.

    多多切磋!

    Koh

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    1. Koh, that's awesome! Any tips/ family secret you care to share? :D

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    2. ohh, nothing really very special . like you mentioned, lot of hardwork as need to slam the bitch till it is bouncy. Mine add chilli padi , spring onion ..

      btw, cny is around the corner & it is steamboat time! wonder if you can get this yellowtail in England. I travel to Germany quite often and the seafood is very limited and look very "sickly" in the supermarket, unlike in asia we get seafood either jumping or slimy

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    3. Ooh I love the chilli added versions!

      Nah, cannot. We have good seafood esp since I work at the farmer's market, but of course these yellowtail fishes are not native to the english waters, so they will prob be imported and not fresh!

      happy cny! x

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  39. Hi

    Help! I love fish balls and have just tried to make fish balls for the very first time. I followed your recipe. They taste delicious but I cannot get the texture right! Yours look lovely and smooth... mine are springy but a little rough in texture. When biting into them, they fall apart slightly. What am I doing wrong - not enough water, not enough chopping or not enough throwing? Any advice for me to go by for next time when I make them?

    Thanks

    Angela

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    1. Hi Angela!

      Mine are not smooth though, they are a bit pockmarked and rough, but I find that to be the case for handmade fishballs! Falling apart slightly might mean that they have a bit too much water, so you might want to try adding less. If it's springy, it means the throwing is prob enough. I think chopping more might hlp for a smoother texture too, because if not you get flaky bits. Hope this helps!! At least they tasted delicious! :)

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    2. Also, given that it's your first time, woah good job!

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    3. Thank you! Will give it another try and see how it goes.
      Love your other recipes so definitely will be trying them out. :)

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  40. hi,
    in your recipe you listed 1 tbsp white pepper but you didn't write when to put that in. Is it in the first mixup with salt and water or later?
    thanks

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    1. pfft. my bad, I'll go edit the recipe now! yes you can mix it with the salt and water, or even later, it doesn't really matter. you can also play with flavours, adding chopped chillies and spring onions (obviously then that has to be added after all the hand mincing). good luck :)

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  41. Thanks!!!!! Im glad that im not the only one wanting to make homemade fish balls. I googled chinese bouncy fish balls and found your awesome site. Today im trying bouncy beef balls, next week fish:-)

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    1. Ooh let me know how that goes! I've tried making beef balls before too, worked once, failed the other, so resisting posting anythign till I've got it down. Good luck on the fishballs! :)

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  42. Hi i want to know if this recipe and the technique will work for salmon. Thanks

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    1. Hey! I don't know as I haven't tried. What I hear is that certain types of fish have more 'gow' to be slapped into boucniness, which I've mentioned above. But you could go ahead and try anyway! I'm interested to see if it works too! Good luck! :)

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  43. This is really awesome. Fishballs were my favorite when I was a small girl and I have been looking and trying so many recipes, but none comes close to the fishballs of my childhood memories. But then, none specified the kind of fish like you do. So I will definitely try your recipe as soon as I can get ikan parang or ikan ekor kuning, as we call it here in Indonesia. Thanks.

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    1. I love fishballs too! Which was why I set out to find out how to make it! It's still tricky even with the right fish; it does take a few tries to get the hang of it, but do not give up! Let me know how it goes! x

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  44. You're so witty! That makes reading your blog so much fun! = )

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    1. Thank you lovely!!! I'm a bit slow reading comments but thank you!

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  45. Great post! I love fishballs but my husband abhors them. Too bad for him. I need another appreciative audience before I make them. Otherwise the 'hardwork' is under-appreciated, not to mention delicious fishballs - the REAL stuff!

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    1. Send them my way :) I love fishballs :)

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  46. Hi Shu Han
    We all love fishballs! (a family of five)
    Wondering how much corn flour or whatever flour I can add in to boost the quantity but not affect the texture?. We don't mind if it's not 100% fish as those fm hawker centers taste just great.

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    1. Hello hello! Sorry for the late late reply I'm terrible keeping up with comments! That I don't know as I didn't use cornflour but maybe try by adding a little at a time till you get the texture that you want. Make sure it's not too stiff, and not too wet to slap. Good luck!! x

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  47. I am so happy I found this post! I live in Toronto, and Chinatown here offers the same floury-fishballs that you probably have in London. I have been craving fishball soup so badly, so I will definitely give this a shot very soon! Thanks for the pictures with the post, definitely helpful (:

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    1. Hello alison! Woo! So happy to hear that! Yes I find it's only people like us, when driven to desperation, that try to make (real) fishballs ourselves. I'm back in sg at the moment and it's so easy to hop out to the markets haha. Good luck with this. It's tricky finding the fish though... might work with mackerel but I've not tried that myself...

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  48. Hi Shu Han, thanks for dropping by my blog. Looking forward to see you more. Hey, you certainly made it seems so easy in making bouncy fish balls. I now know that the secret must be in the omission of corn flour. I usually add corn flour in my fish paste and no wonder they don't bounce! Thanks for sharing.

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    1. Some people find it works with cornflour but my favourite ones from young has always been the au naturel ones :) Good luck with this!

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  49. I work in a newly opened shabu restaurant. We've been struggling to get our fish balls to taste just right, but the comments we get back from customers are always conflicting. Some say they taste "too fishy" while others eat the same exact product and say they're just right. We've tried working on a wooden cutting board to absorb the fish oil, adding lemon juice, nothing works. We're about to give up and just use frozen bought, but I think having a signature house fish ball is important. Unfortunately none of us in the kitchen are Asian, and have never eaten fish balls before. Are they suppose to have a texture at all, or should it feel completely smooth, almost like biting into a soft rubber ball? Also, any tips for working with Spanish mackerel?. We use it because it's an easier fish to work with than snapper.

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    1. Hello hello! Sorry for the late reply! Re:fishiness, it's probably a matter of personal taste since some are ok with it. Spanish mackerel is ok- I think the spotted mackerel, wolf herring or yellowtail snapper are the preferred fishes because they give the right 'gow'- some kind of protein thing. It should feel overall smooth, but sort of pockmarked, and it defintely will not be as smooth as commercially made ones, not like a rubber ball at all! When you bite into it it should have a bounce and be sort of juicy especially if it was cooked in soup. Good luck! xx

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  50. Excellent, good instructions. Thanks

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  51. I am a Singaporean residing in the midwest of usa any tips on hor fun ???

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    1. Hello Sharmila! What kind of tips on hor fun exactly? How to make the noodles, how to make the dish (braised? stir fried with beef?) ? xx

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  52. U may tried to search fishball recipe in Facebook. ..there r selling handmade fishball in malaysia that I ever had it ... bouncy like ping pong ball... they even invited health ministry to certified their products... It terrific awesome

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  53. Aaaaaah!! I want to try it!

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  54. Hi!

    This recipe sounds fantastic! As a German I am a bit confused regarding the type of fish, because they get rather "strange" names for marketing reasons over here.

    Thus: Can I use Alaska pollock (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alaska_Pollock) or this one http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iridescent_shark ?

    Both are quite cheap and sold here frozen.

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  55. I put the fish in the blender and had a hard time. The recipe should specify to not use your mother´s prehistoric blender to mix the fish. :P

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    1. Hahahaha. Always an option to just hand mince the good old prehistoric way ;)

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  56. Hi, I want to know, u r using 1 kg of fish, n the water is 60 - 70 % by volume, so how much in cc is the water? Is it 600 cc? I always failed making fish balls, not springy n bouncy at all. Really need your advice, thanks

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    1. By volume meaning by sight, 600cc will be by weight. I know it's probably not the most accurate but that's how recipes from aunties always go yikes! I really want to re-do this and measure when I get the chance though- I'll keep you updated when i do! Meanwhile, note the water is not a definite amount- keep adding bit by bit as you mince till the texture feels right. Good luck x

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  57. I made these tonight and, while they certainly were delicious, I ended up with something completely different than what you'd described. After I'd added the water bit by bit and it looked ready to slap all over the place, I started thumping it around. It ended up just getting mushier and wetter and became more of a loose paste than a coherent ball. I had to add about 3/4 cup flour bit by bit and then thump it around for another five minutes before I could make balls. I live in New Zealand, and I used a white fish that we call Tarakihi - perhaps this type of fish is much more watery?

    Regardless of how different they were from the recipe, they were still a success! I poached them in vege stock until they firmed up (because I was afraid they'd fall apart when I went to cook them in a sauce) and then cooked them the rest of the way in a lemongrass-coconut broth with a few spring vegetables. While it wasn't what I set out to make for dinner it received rave reviews regardless! I can't wait to try this again using muuuuuuuuch less water and see how they go :)

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    1. If the fish meat turn out 2 wet n mushy, then add more fish meat. Cook the fishball in a temperate water at around 24 Celsius 4 about 4 2 5 mins n then slowly increase the heat up 2 30 Celsius n cook 4 a min. After it was done, place the fishballs in ice cold water. That's it. Happy fish balling.

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  58. Making fishballs of 2day standard can b achieve quite easy. It makes no difference what kind of fishes that could roll out the bounciness textures. Living in some remote countries where 1 couldn't find any fish that suppose 2 create it. 2 make my very own fishballs. I used meat from escolar or swordfish. I don't wracked it but by using a smart kitchen ware called vorwerk thermomix TM31. This kitchen ware solve my everyday dilemma of cooking. My fishballs recipe consists of baking powders, tapioca starch, msg n fish emulsifier. I am not a healthy freek. Food that are relevant tasty condone 2 my needs. Humans only live once.

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  59. I would unquestionably provide ten out of ten for such incredible content. bestfishinglinereviews

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  60. You are my best helper. I live in New York, about an hour and a half from Chinatown, and my son adores fish balls. I can't find any premade product here (gratefully so if they're horrible) so I've been searching for a proper recipe. This looks like the real thing as found in Chinatown. I just need to buy some white fish and get cooking. My mother used to make a European version of fish balls, but your recipe is what my son craves. I'll be stopping off for the fish and making some of these for supper, perhaps with a nice curry sauce. I can't wait! He's caught a chill, and this will perk him right up. Thanks Shu Han.

    Mrs. B.

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    Replies
    1. Hi Mrs. B, thanks for the kind words! Made my day! p.s. I have done more experiments since, using a food processor. Fish like coley, hake, sea bream or bass work well too, but I tend to also add a pinch of arrowroot starch to bind them together. Be careful with the amount of water added!

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  61. Thankssss...
    My daughter was asking me to make a homemade fishball, and I dont know how to make it. So i googled and found this blog. Managed to taste a homemade bouncy fishball today.
    Thanks once again.

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  62. Watched the video at the end of the post! So funny (your camera!). =P.

    Good informative post!

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  63. Fantastic... I've made it the boink... Boink... Boink fish ball yaaaaaaay!!! I use yellowtail fish and it work very well... Thank you so much for the recipe... Now everybody happy ahahah

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  64. Nice fish food. My favorite food. That's great information. Thanks for sharing this blog. I did a search and found your blog and glowing review. It's been a big help! Thanx!

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  65. Thank you for sharing. This blog is exactly what i need.

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  66. hi, may I know how do you keep the fish balls if you are doing them in a batch? As far as I know, once fish balls are kept in freezer, the texture changes and becomes soggy when thawed. I would like to make them in a batch which can consume in probably a week. Any tips to share? Thanks in advance :)

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